spacerErica Licea-Kane

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My works are completely rooted in my textile training. The grids, both visible and structural and the repetition within each piece comes from, and are inherent to the most basic levels of textile creation. In place of textiles I create lines and texture with a pastry bag as I extrude acrylic medium to make surfaces that invoke fabric or enlarged weaves. I work hard at manipulating the material so that the surfaces are obscure, prompting questions about process, materials and time invested.

The works are an outgrowth of my childhood as I spent many hours in fabric stores with my Mother. It was then that I learned about the nuances of cloth, the subtleties of woven color and the “hand” of fabric. To this day I still love the smell of fabric stores and find great comfort in being surrounded by bolts of cloth. As a child, the once a year journey through my Grandmothe'rs linen chest was also magical because I got to touch the handmade bobbin lace and embroidered cloth. I spent many hours as a teenager engaged in hand embroidery marking the beginning of my love for repetitive and additive art making. That predilection carried me through all of my years as a textile student and lives with me today.

As much as I enjoy the art of patterning, and frequently immerse myself in decoration, my work process is a lesson in order and life balance. As a person who is sensitive to imbalances that can feel plaguing, my studio life helps me to make sense of those uncomfortable shifts and ultimately my work becomes an act of finding creative equilibrium. My hope is that my work invites viewers to explore the physicality of the surfaces and the importance of the edges. I love to hear narratives about the work from viewers who often make reference to aerial views or topographical views of cities.

With the density of the surfaces I consider my works to be object-paintings that address all of the formal concerns attached to abstract painting. But mostly, there are never enough layers.